You Can Now Visit The Wreck Of The Titanic — For A Huge Price

For the first time since 2012, History.com reports, civilian tourists will soon be able to visit the remains of the ship 2.5 miles below the surface of the North Atlantic, about 400 miles east of Newfoundland. Back in 2012,...

 

A Tour INSIDE The Titanic in Black and White Photos

The Titanic was one of the most ambitious ship projects in history at the time. It attracted and intrigued passengers from all walks of life. These photos take you on a tour inside the great ship… The RMS Titanic departing...

 

Jack Dempsey vs Jess Willard, Heavyweight Championship of the World, 1919

Reigning heavyweight champion stood 6’6″ and 225 pounds when he climbed into the ring to fight Jack Dempsey in 1919. His reputation preceded him as he had previously fought a boxer named John “Bull”...

 

19 Rare Lantern Slides Show the Postmen from 1914 – 1918

A collection of lantern slides from The Postal Museum showing postal operations for various nationalities during the First World War. Most of these photos were hand-colored. Handwritten captions in black ink on labels above...

 

Did Author Really ‘Predicts’ the Titanic Sinking 14 Years Earlier?

The novella Futility, written in 1898 by U.S. writer Morgan Robertson, shows some eerie similarities to the famed story of the sinking of the Titanic. Just how many similarities? Let’s take a look: These eerie “coincidences”...

 

Why Was There A Full-Size Battleship In the Middle of New York In 1917?

In 1917, the U.S. Navy came up with a creative idea to boost military recruitment: They would build a full-sized battleship with a working crew right in the heart of New York City! That’s right, starting in early 1917,...

 

Anna Coleman Ladd Masks Worn by French Soldiers With Mutilated Faces, 1918

World War I caused the death of millions of combatants and civilians, while countless soldiers suffered from injury and disfigurement. These men worried about their homecoming — how would strangers react, but more importantly...

 

Women Workers of WWI: Stepping Up to Fuel the Great War

When Britain entered World War I in 1914, thousands of women joined the workforce to fill jobs left by men sent to the frontlines. They took over transit works and police work. They became bank tellers and firefighters. They...

 

Life Around the Yangtze River, China in the 1910s

The Yangtze River is the longest river in Asia and the third-longest in the world. It’s the longest in the world to flow entirely within one country and its river basin is home to one-third of the country’s population....

 
Marie Curie Rejection

That Time Marie Curie Was Rejected Membership to the French Academy of Sciences Because She’s a Woman

It’s probably hard to believe that a two-time Nobel Prize winner for her work in both physics and chemistry, a person who discovered and created the word “radioactivity,” was rejected for membership by the French Academy...

 
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