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Emily Dickinson: Things You Didn't Know About The Famous Writer, Horticulturist

Literature | May 28, 2020

Whether you're a fan of poetry or prefer HBO, you know Emily Dickinson, the poet from Amherst, Massachusetts who spent the 1800s writing...

Golden Gate Bridge Opens In 1937: 200,000 People Celebrate By Walking Across It

Iconic buildings | May 27, 2020

Today, it's hard to imagine San Francisco without the iconic, bright orange Golden Gate Bridge serving as the city's centerpiece, but th...

Dewey Readmore Books: The Celebrity Library Cat Of The 1980s

Animals in History | May 26, 2020

In the 1980s, America fell in love with Dewey Readmore Books, a convolutedly named cat who lived in the Spencer Public Library in Spencer, Iowa. Throughout...

1979: The First Ever Missing Child Appears On A Milk Carton

1970s | May 25, 2020

May 25 is National Missing Children's Day, an occasion for various organizations like the Center for Missing and Exploited Children to raise awareness of th...

Samuel Morse: Inventor Of The Telegraph, Failed Painter, Photographer

1800s | May 24, 2020

You may only know Samuel Morse for that code he invented, but there was much more to the man than dots and dashes. He was also a mediocre student ...

1618 Defenestration Of Prague: Two Catholic Lords, Secretary Survive 70-Ft. Fall

Medieval History | May 23, 2020

On May 23, 1618, a divine miracle took place in Prague. That, or three guys just caught a lucky—albeit stinky—break. What began as a po...

The Invention Of Kryptonite: The Real Reason The Man Of Steel Needed A Weakness

Literature | May 22, 2020

There are a few things that everyone knows about Superman: He's faster than a speeding bullet, he can leap tall buildings in a single bo...

The First Bicycle Is Introduced In New York City, 1819: History Of The Velocipede

1800s | May 21, 2020

In 1819, the bicycle rolled across the Atlantic into the Big Apple all the way from Europe. Known as "velocipedes" or "swift walkers,"...

Potemkin Villages: The History Of Fake Buildings For Tricking Outsiders

Abandoned Buildings | May 20, 2020

No. 41–46 Leinster Gardens. (David Anstiss/Wikimedia Commons) What do you see in the photo above? Just a beautiful upscale residential street, ba...

Heroin Use During The Vietnam War: How The Drug Was Taken Secretly By Soldiers

Vietnam War | May 19, 2020

For nearly 20 years, from 1955 to the mid-'70s, the American military was thrust into the jungles of Vietnam. The war took an emotional t...

Agnodice: The First Female Doctor Who Disguised As A Man And Became A Medical Legend

Ancient History | May 18, 2020

Today, roughly equal numbers of men and women study medicine, but for centuries, women were prohibited from the practice. That didn...

The Order Of The Dragon: An Ancient Society Dracula's Father Belonged To

Medieval History | May 16, 2020

Medieval Europe was lousy with chivalric orders, bands of knights, and noblemen who lived by a set of self-imposed, righteous rules. The member...

Elizabeth Báthory: The West's Most Legendary Serial Killer

Weird History | May 15, 2020

One of the most prolific alleged serial killers who's ever lived, Elizabeth Báthory, had the perks of timing and aristocracy on her side. This Hungarian nob...

San Francisco's 1904 Black Plague Scare (And How It Was Covered Up)

1900s | May 14, 2020

South tower of the Golden Gate Bridge in San Francisco. (Brocken Inaglory/Wikimedia Commons) The bubonic plague is one of the most catastrophic disea...

History Of The Hot Dog: Why Do We Call Them Dogs? Where Do They Come From?

1800s | May 13, 2020

Hot dogs were a favorite of street vendors. (Wikimedia Commons/Public domain) There's nothing more America than a hot dog. You can find them b...

Why Is It Called The Roaring '20s?

1920s | May 12, 2020

Magazine illustration of a roaring '20s party, New York , New York, 1926. (Transcendental Graphics/Getty Images) From provocative jazz music and scandalous flappers to snazzy bootleg...

The Fascinating Conspiracy Theory About Bob Marley's Death

Recent History | May 11, 2020

(Caspiax/Wikimedia Commons) On May 11, 1981, reggae's spiritual savior and biggest hit-maker, Bob Marley, passed away at what is now the University of Miami H...

The Crimes Of Warren Jeffs: "President/Prophet" Of The Fundamentalist Church Of Jesus C...

Recent History | May 10, 2020

In 2002, polygamous priest and former member of the FBI's Ten Most Wanted List Warren Jeffs rose to top of the Fundamentalist...

The Hitler Diaries Hoax: How Germans Faked Something Everyone Would Read

World War II | May 9, 2020

On April 25, 1983, Stern magazine, Germany’s version of Life, announced to the world that they'd come into possession of Adolf Hitler's diaries...

The Invention Of Oreo: How America's Best-Selling Cookie Got Its Name

1900s | May 8, 2020

Creamy, chocolatey, and impossible to limit to the recommended serving size, the Oreo is a timeless cookie that no household is complete without. ...

DISCOVERED: 20 Sealed Ancient Egyptian Coffins Near Luxor In Egypt

Archaeological FInds | May 7, 2020

The heyday of the Egyptian archaeological dig may have come and gone, but the desert still holds secrets from the past. In 2019, one of the most surp...

Orson Welles: Actor, Director, Writer, Legend, And Eventual Magician

Movies | May 6, 2020

Reaching the zenith of your career in your twenties has to be maddening. Orson Welles directed Citizen Kane when he was only 25 years old, and even...

1891: What It Was Like When Carnegie Hall Opened In New York For The First Time

1800s | May 5, 2020

1895: View of Carnegie Hall on the corner of Seventh Avenue and 57th Street, New York City. (Photo by Museum of the City of New York/Byron ...

Freedom Riders: The Men And Women Who Fought Segregation On Buses

1960s | May 4, 2020

In 1961, a group of brave people decided to catch a bus. Their actions didn't require courage (just) because of the germs and filth that cover every s...

1944: World War II Rationing Of Most Meat Grades Officially Ends

World War II | May 3, 2020

During the onslaught of World War II, Americans at home tightened their belts and sacrificed many of their favorite meals when they were asked to ratio...

The 1940 Olympics Were Canceled Because Of World War II

World War II | May 2, 2020

(Wada Sanzō/Wikimedia Commons) The 1940 Olympic Games were supposed to be a coming-out party of sorts for Japan. Initially scheduled to take place from September...

ZunZuneo: When The U.S. Developed A Fake Twitter To Control The Cuban Population

Recent History | May 1, 2020

Hearkening back to the height of the Cold War, the ZunZuneo project was developed in 2009 by the U.S. Agency International Development,...

Hitler's Last Day: Everything We Know About His Bunker Suicide

World War II | April 30, 2020

Hitler's bunker just before demolition in July 1947. (Bundesarchiv, Bild 183-V04744 / CC-BY-SA 3.0) On this day in 1945, a shot rang out in a Berlin bunke...

William Randolph Hearst: Father Of Yellow Journalism/Fake News Billionaire

Literature | April 29, 2020

There's never been an American character quite like William Randolph Hearst, the business tycoon, newspaper publisher, and politician who cre...

Themiscyra: The Ancient Real-Life Version Of The Amazons' Mythical Home

Ancient History | April 28, 2020

One of the more fascinating stories from ancient mythology is that of the Amazon women. (Photo by DeAgostini/Getty Images) In Greek mythology, th...

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