20 Things That Terrified Kids In The 1960s

By Sophia Maddox | February 16, 2024

Rock N' Roll

As the 1960s unfolded, life transitioned from black and white to a myriad of shades of gray, introducing a new era of uncertainty and complexity. In this gallery, we explore some of the things that terrified young people during this transformative period. From the looming specter of World War III and the eerie tales of mummies to the heart-pounding fear of quicksand and the rebellious allure of rock 'n' roll, we delve into the fears that shaped the imaginations of youth in the 1960s. Join us on this journey through the fears of a bygone era and discover how they reflect the evolving landscape of a generation.

Let's step back in time and explore the fears that once haunted the hearts of young people in the 1960s. Continue reading to uncover the stories behind these fears and the unique experiences that defined this tumultuous decade.

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Parents and societal norms often viewed rock music and its associated lifestyle as a threat to traditional values. The music was considered controversial due to its loud and electrifying sound, with lyrics that sometimes challenged social norms and authority. The rock 'n' roll culture, characterized by youth rebellion, non-conformity, and the embrace of countercultural ideals, led parents to caution their children against it. The fear of rock 'n' roll stemmed from concerns that it could potentially lead young people astray, promoting a lifestyle of excess and defiance. While many children were drawn to the excitement of rock 'n' roll, they also faced the apprehension of being seen as rebellious or straying from the values upheld by their parents' generation.

The Draft

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During the 1960s, the fear of the draft weighed heavily on many American children, even those who were not of the age to be eligible for military service. This apprehension was largely fueled by the ongoing Vietnam War and the possibility that as they grew older, they might face conscription into the armed forces. The draft was a constant presence in the news, and with the conflict escalating, young people were acutely aware of the consequences of reaching draft-eligible age. The fear of being drafted into a highly controversial and deadly war created a pervasive sense of uncertainty and anxiety among children, as they grappled with the unsettling idea that their future might include military service and the potential dangers it entailed.