Astonishing Natural Disasters In History

By Sophia Maddox | January 30, 2024

Supercell Thunderstorm in Montana, 2010 (US)

It seems like there's a natural disaster every other day somewhere in the world, and it's easy to panic about something with "disaster" right in the name. That's not to say there's nothing to be alarmed about---don't take this as discouragement from following your local authorities' evacuation instructions when the big one hits. It's important to remember, however, that Mother Earth is an old broad. She's been there, done that, and she's survived much worse than what's currently being thrown at her. Well, mostly.

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Source: Reddit

The above photo was taken during a storm that caused some of the least damage of anything you'll see here, but boy, it sure looks cool. It's called a supercell, which is a thundercloud that "contains a deep and persistent rotating updraft called a mesocyclone." We don't know what that means, but the result is benignly terrifying. This one happened just west of Glasgow, Montana in July 2010, and pretty much just hung out for several hours, scaring the bejeesus out of the local residents who must have thought they were about to be abducted by aliens, before nonchalantly moving on.

Oct. 12, 1962 The steeple atop historic Campbell Hall, on the Oregon College of Education Campus, Monmouth.

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Source: Reddit

On October 12, 1962, the Columbus Day Storm, as it has come to be known, tore through Oregon in the worst windstorm the state had ever seen. People who saw it describe the sky as a bizarre color of yellow and green, filled with clouds that brought storms strong enough to hurl a truck over the side of the bridge on which it had been stuck in traffic. A total of 46 people died and $1.25 billion of damage in 2012 dollars was done, including the toppling of the steeple on top of Campbell Hall, an 1871 building on the campus of Western Oregon University and the oldest building in the Oregon university system.