Behind Closed Doors: Insights into Scientology's Unique Philosophies

By Sophia Maddox | March 22, 2024

They Don't Believe In Mental Health Treatment

The intriguing and enigmatic beliefs of Scientology have been at the center of the zeitgeist for decades, but many people may not know exactly what goes on inside the wall of this celebrity focused church. Today we're going to delve into some of the lesser-known aspects of this controversial religion, shedding light on concepts such as Xenu, engrams, the tone scale, thetans, and silent births.

Delve deeper into the complexities of Scientology's unique teachings and gain a deeper understanding of this intriguing religion that has attracted significant attention and controversy over the years. Let's embark on this enlightening journey together and continue exploring the fascinating world of Scientology.

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(Paramount Pictures)

When asked in her Reddit AMA about Scientology's policy on mental health, Leah Remini responded:

They deny mental illness and afflictions. They promote that you can heal your psycho-sematic issues with their 'technology.' They will get in the way of people taking medications. They will prevent people from getting the real medical help that they need. And in some cases have caused suicides because of it. Scientology is mentally abusive because we are all taught that we are responsible for everything.

Humans Evolved From Basically Everything

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(getty images)

In L. Ron Hubbard’s book, Scientology: The History of Man, the author drills down on descriptions of things that happened to us in previous lives. According to the beliefs of Scientology, thetans, which are considered everlasting beings, have lived through numerous past lives that have been marked by various traumas spanning across time. Consequently, individuals in the present possess subconscious recollections of these past lives, embodying diverse forms such as clams, atoms, cells undergoing mitosis, early photosynthetic organisms, sloths, and many others.

Hubbard states that the clam is a great example of our past lives, he argues specifically that over millennia the hinges of the clam eventually transformed into the hinges of the human jaw and that by getting in touch with your inner clam, you can change the way you act as a human. Hubbard writes:

Should you desire to confirm this, describe to some uninitiated person the death of a clam without saying what you are describing. ‘Can you imagine a clam sitting on the beach, opening and closing its shell very rapidly?’ (Make a motion with your thumb and forefinger of a rapid opening and closing).
The victim may grip his jaws with his hand and feel quite upset. He may even have to have a few teeth pulled: At the very least he will argue as to whether or not the shell stays open at the end or closed. And he will, with no hint of the death aspect of it, talk about the ‘poor clam’ and he will feel quite sad emotionally.

Hubbard continues:

Discussion of these incidents with the uninitiated in Scientology can cause havoc. Should you describe the ‘clam’ to someone, you may restimulate it in him to the extent of causing severe jaw pain. One such victim, after hearing about a clam death, could not use his jaws for three days.