Infamous Photos Show A Darker Side To History

By | September 20, 2021

Survivors of 1972 of the infamous Andes plane crash. The passengers resorted to cannibalism to survive 72 days in the snow

History may be full of wonderful and exciting moments, but the following photos show just how dark and disturbing the past can be. Even the most beautiful of these rare photos from the past contains something eerie if you look close enough.

You won't find these dark images or their disturbing stories in history books. As chilling as these photos are if you fully take them in you'll see a silver lining in their darkness. These recently uncovered photos will not only shock you, they'll provide insight into some of our darkest times. You'll see what life was really like in some of the lowest times in history which can really put today in perspective...

Each one of these eerie photos from the past shows a dark side to history, but they also show just how much better off we are today.

test article image
source: reddit

When Uruguayan Air Force Flight 571 crashed along the Argentine-Chilean border in the Andes on October 13, 1972, 29 members of the Uruguayan rugby team and their families were stranded. The group had little hope for survival but they did what they had to do to keep going for another day. During the 72 days that the were stuck in the Andes the group was forced to resort to cannibalism to survive.

Survivor Eduardo Strauch told NPR that as bad as the nearly three months were in the Andes, it was the first few days that were the worst:

As you can imagine, it has been the most awful, terrible days of my life. It was awful and long nights. We have a very small space. We were 29 people at the first. And we have no warm clothes, no water. We have to melt snow. It was very difficult because the weather was very cold. And the snow was all over the kerosene of the engines of the plane. We are surrounded with our friends, who died. And that first night was really impossible to describe.

Bob Ross in the early 1970s before the paint and before the afro

Even though he passed away in 1995, Bob Ross remains one of the most relaxing figures in the world of television. His series, The Joy of Painting, was one of the most watched programs on PBS that helped him launch an empire. However, after he was diagnosed with lymphoma he was confronted by his partners in Bob Ross, Inc., they wanted him to sign away the rights of his likeness and name for one percent of the profits.

test article image
source: reddit

Referred to as "Grand Theft Bob," Bob Ross, Inc. went into overdrive with the licensing of Ross' likeness following his death on July 4, 1995. Regardless of the fact that Ross made multiple changes to his will concerning his fortune in the months before his death, his estate was essentially locked out of any decisions about products featuring his name thanks to a lawsuit. In the 2010s an agreement was finally reached between Steve Ross and the family operating Bob Ross, Inc., that allowed Ross' name and likeness to be used as long as Steve could work in public under his own name without fear of being slapped with a hefty lawsuit. It's sad to think that such a messy situation came out of a guy who just wanted to show his viewers how to paint a few beautiful trees.