Insane Movie Mistakes That The Audience Didn't See

By Sophia Maddox | December 17, 2023

Clueless - Alicia Silverstone Mispronounces "Haitians"

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(Paramount Pictures)

If you're a '90s movie fanatic like me, then you probably know all about the iconic teen comedy Clueless. And while the film is chock-full of hilarious one-liners and unforgettable moments, there's one little detail that you might have missed.

During one scene, actress Alicia Silverstone mispronounces the word "Haitians," saying it as "Hate-ee-ans" instead. But what's truly remarkable about this flub is that director Amy Heckering actually stopped the crew from correcting her.

As Heckering explained to Vogue, she wanted Silverstone to deliver the line with complete confidence, without any self-awareness that she was mispronouncing the word. And boy, did it pay off. Silverstone's mispronunciation is now one of the most memorable moments in the film, and it's all thanks to Heckering's keen directing instincts.

So the next time you watch Clueless, keep an ear out for that infamous mispronunciation. And remember, sometimes the best mistakes are the ones that we embrace and turn into comedic gold.

Full Metal Jacket - R. Lee Ermey's Entire Performance

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(warner bros.)

Full Metal Jacket, a searing exposé on the ravages of war, continues to captivate audiences with its unflinching portrayal of the horrors of combat. Despite being nominated for an Academy Award for Best Writing, it's worth noting that the film's most memorable character was never even supposed to have lines. R. Lee Ermey was originally brought on as a technical advisor, drawing on his real-life experience as a Parris Island Marine drill instructor to coach the actors. However, when director Stanley Kubrick saw Ermey in action, he realized that the man himself was the embodiment of the character he had in mind: the tough-talking, no-nonsense Gunnery Sergeant Hartman.

Rather than relying on scripted lines, Kubrick gave Ermey free rein to improvise as he saw fit, capturing the essence of his drill instructor persona on film. Over multiple takes Ermey and Kubrick crafted a tour de force performance that stands as one of the most iconic in cinematic history. And for those who might claim that Kubrick was a rigid, controlling director, the story of how Ermey's natural talent was harnessed for the film proves that even the greatest auteurs know when to let their actors take the reins.