Look Closer... Vintage Photos That Were Never Edited

By Sophia Maddox | December 14, 2023

Bill Murray in his 1968 high school graduation photo. 

test article image
Source: Reddit

Local caddy graduates! In 1968, Bill Murray received his diploma from Loyola Academy in Wilmette, Illinois, and headed west to study pre-med at Regis University in Denver, Colorado. Pre-med? Really, Bill? That plan didn't last long, and he soon dropped out and returned to the Chicago area, where he eventually joined his brother Brian Doyle Murray in the Second City comedy troupe. Two other Murray boys, John and Joel, became actors; it's said that the acting bug tended to bite these Murrays because, as kids, they were constantly competing with each other to elicit laughter from their father, Edward Murray. The brothers also worked as golf caddies at Indian Hill Golf Club, an experience that led Brian to co-write a movie about the unsung heroes of the links -- it was Caddyshack, of course, in which Bill played deranged groundsman Carl Spackler.

Dr. Frank N. Furter with Columbia and Magenta. (1975) 

test article image
Source: Reddit

There are cult films, and there are cult films. The cultiest of all cult films has to be The Rocky Horror Picture Show, in which Tim Curry (center) played Frank N. Furter -- a  self-described "sweet transvestite from Transsexual Transylvania." This bizarre gender-bending musical (the film version of the successful stage production The Rocky Horror Show) went virtually unnoticed when it opened in 1975, and might have vanished, just another weird movie that flopped. But an executive at 20th Century Fox noted that offbeat "midnight movies" were becoming a thing, and arranged to have the film screened at theaters looking to make a little money on the late-night crowd. It proved to be the right movie for the right audience -- fans, often in costume, came back week after week to watch, sing along, and shout retorts at characters on the screen. The movie's addictive, ritualistic appeal has kept it in theaters to the present day, making it the longest-running theatrical release of all time.