War Photos From The Past You Would Never Find In History Books

By Sophia Maddox | July 25, 2023

September 15TH, 1950, time to re-up

Amidst the noise and glamour of Hollywood and pop culture, it's easy to forget that history is replete with brutal and horrific moments of conflict and war. These moments are documented through photographs that capture the heart-wrenching stories of those who have witnessed the worst of humanity. As you scroll through this gallery of war photos, you will encounter images that show the human cost of war, the devastation it causes, and the resilience of the human spirit in the face of adversity.

These photos offer a glimpse into a different side of history, one that is often forgotten or ignored in mainstream narratives. They serve as a reminder that war is not just about battles and tactics, but about the lives of ordinary people caught in the crossfire. We invite you to take a moment to view these images with empathy and understanding, to acknowledge the sacrifices of those who have been impacted by war, and to reflect on what we can do to prevent future conflicts. Keep reading to bear witness to the raw reality of war through the eyes of those who have captured it with their cameras.

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Soldiers can be seen replenishing their food and other essential supplies needed until the war came to an end. Soldiers were also brought in to replace injured marines.

Taking Loyalty To A Whole New Level 

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Hiroo Onoda, a Japanese intelligence officer, was a man of unwavering determination. He held his ground on the Philippines' Lubang Island, long after World War Two was over, for almost three decades. He was a soldier who refused to surrender until his former commander relieved him of his duties.

In the final days of the war, Onoda was a lieutenant stationed on Lubang, a minuscule island in the Philippines. Soon after his arrival, a US attack forced the Japanese combatants to retreat into the jungle. But Onoda refused to yield and remained concealed on the island for nearly 30 years. In 1959, the Japanese government declared him dead, but he was still very much alive, devoted to a covert mission that demanded he safeguard the island until the imperial army's return. In his mind, the war had never ended, and he was resolute in his conviction.